Tea & Book Chat: The Thousandth Floor by Katharine McGee (The Thousandth Floor #1)

*This book was sent to me by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.  This is no way swayed my opinions.*

The Thousandth Floor by Katharine McGee is pitched as a series for readers who enjoy Pretty Little Liars and Gossip Girl so I immediately added it to my TBR.  I was so excited to pick up a copy of the ARC at BEA (despite it’s beautiful final cover not having been released yet at the time the ARC was printed) and it ended up being the first book I read from my haul when I returned home.  The Thousandth Floor was just the right combination of drama, suspense and most of all ridiculousness because while the book may seem like it’s about your typical group of rich teens, it’s actually about your typical group of rich teens FROM THE FUTURE.  The book takes place in Manhattan, which has been replaced with a single thousand floor tower (the rich kids living on the upper floors) in the year 2118.  I definitely enjoyed the story but if it hadn’t been for all of the inventive future tech and ways of life of the future I wouldn’t have been as into it as I was.

The Thousandth Floor begins with a character falling off the roof of the thousandth floor and plummeting to their death and then it immediately flashes back and details the events of the past two months leading up to that night.  The victim of the fall isn’t revealed until the final chapters so all of the speculation also adds to the fun of reading.  The story is told through the multiple POVs of mean girl Leda, little miss perfect Avery (no really, her parents designed her genetics to be perfect) who’s harboring quite a secret, the outgoing and fun-loving Eris who’s life is about to spawn much gossip, Rylin, the poor girl from the lower floors of the tower who bonds with a member of the upper floors and Watt, a tech genius, also with a big secret.  I will say that this is one book that I didn’t love all of the perspectives in.  Despite some overlap in story lines, I found I most enjoyed Leda, Eris, and Avery’s POVs.  The story is really quick paced and it’s so full of drama that it’ll keep you completely engaged.  Even if there’s a lull in plot, it doesn’t feel that way because that’s when McGee takes the opportunity to describe some fun futuristic element such as screaming gummy bears, hover cars or floating bubbles of alcohol.  I don’t want to go too far into her vision of the future because part of the fun is definitely reading and discovering everything for yourself.

Final Thoughts:  The Thousandth Floor by Katharine McGee is one of the few novels which lives up to the marketing comparison made prior to its release.  If you enjoy Gossip Girl and Pretty Little Liars you’ll definitely find enjoyment in this novel.  Come for the drama, stay for the intriguing future ways 2118 has to offer and you’ll be left wishing you didn’t have to wait a whole year for the next installment.  This is great book to read if you’re in a slump because it’s quick paced and attention grabbing and the mysterious plot will definitely having you craving the next chapter.

Rating 5

New York City as you’ve never seen it before. A thousand-story tower stretching into the sky. A glittering vision of the future, where anything is possible—if you want it enough.

Welcome to Manhattan, 2118.

A hundred years in the future, New York is a city of innovation and dreams. But people never change: everyone here wants something…and everyone has something to lose.

Leda Cole’s flawless exterior belies a secret addiction—to a drug she never should have tried and a boy she never should have touched.

Eris Dodd-Radson’s beautiful, carefree life falls to pieces when a heartbreaking betrayal tears her family apart.

Rylin Myers’s job on one of the highest floors sweeps her into a world—and a romance—she never imagined…but will her new life cost Rylin her old one?

Watt Bakradi is a tech genius with a secret: he knows everything about everyone. But when he’s hired to spy by an upper-floor girl, he finds himself caught up in a complicated web of lies.

And living above everyone else on the thousandth floor is Avery Fuller, the girl genetically designed to be perfect. The girl who seems to have it all—yet is tormented by the one thing she can never have.

Debut author Katharine McGee has created a breathtakingly original series filled with high-tech luxury and futuristic glamour, where the impossible feels just within reach. But in this world, the higher you go, the farther there is to fall…. (via Goodreads)

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Kristin

BookTube: Harry Potter & the Cursed Child Review

I filmed my first review video! With the exception of Cassie, Melissa and I’s monthly book club, Spines With Wines, I usually save my wrap ups for the end of the month.  Apparently, if it’s Harry Potter, I have no trouble talking for 20 minutes straight so that was fun for Andrew to edit lol! Filming this video made me unexpectedly emotional and spoiler warning, I cried two times because Harry<3.

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Tea & Book Chat: It’s Not Summer Without You by Jenny Han (Summer #2)

**Warning! If you haven’t read The Summer I Turned Pretty which is the first book in the Summer trilogy by Jenny Han, there will be spoilers ahead.  You can read my review of the first book instead if you haven’t started the series yet!**

It’s Not Summer Without You is the second book in the Summer trilogy by Jenny Han.  This book picks up almost 10 months after the events of the first book and we spend the majority of it living the current consequences resulting from past events which are often relayed via flashbacks.  Your thrown into a world where many things have changed since The Summer I Turned Pretty ended and because I waited between books (it’s been almost a year since I read the first – also during BookTube-A-Thon!) I initially thought I had forgotten a major thing that happened.  I really enjoyed this book, much more than the first despite how sad it is.

It's Not Summer Without You

Belly is still immature and a bit annoying but after what happened, I felt more for her.  The sibling love triangle is in full force in this book which is one of the only aspects that I really didn’t like from the first book, but I feel like it was developed more thoroughly and that it worked better in It’s Not Summer Without You.  At the end of the first book Conrad and Belly appear to be living happily ever after but everything basically falls apart in this installment.  We see the cruel ways Conrad has been treating Belly, his hot and cold behavior, and their awful prom experience.  There’s one major factor that I do not want to spoil, but it’s a huge reason for his behavior.  While it’s understandable that he would be affected by this event, he definitely uses this as a scapegoat in my opinion.  Belly’s brother Steven was mostly absent from this book and her bossy best friend Taylor continually got on my nerves.

Final Thoughts:  While I enjoyed It’s Not Summer Without You much more than the first book in the Summer series, it was not without its faults.  This is a heartbreaking book to read but I felt that Han truly created and built upon some beautiful relationships in this installment.  As I stated before, the main character, Belly, is still immature and annoying but I definitely forged more of a connection to her.  I’m looking forward to reading book three (much sooner than it took me to get to this one!) and seeing how the story concludes although I am extremely worried that my ship will be sinking.

Rating 4

Can summer be truly summer without Cousins Beach?

It used to be that Belly counted the days until summer, until she was back at Cousins Beach with Conrad and Jeremiah. But not this year. Not after Susannah got sick again and Conrad stopped caring. Everything that was right and good has fallen apart, leaving Belly wishing summer would never come.
But when Jeremiah calls saying Conrad has disappeared, Belly knows what she must do to make things right again. And it can only happen back at the beach house, the three of them together, the way things used to be. If this summer really and truly is the last summer, it should end the way it started–at Cousins Beach. ( via Goodreads)

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Kristin

BookTube: May – June Wrap Up

Today’s video is a combined wrap up covering all the books I read in May and June! I didn’t get to make a separate May video since I was deep in the throes of the final wedding countdown.  I decided to just cover the novels I read in this video and I’m planning on making a separate video about all the manga and graphic novels I binged during May because there were a lot of them!  What have you been reading lately?

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Tea & Book Chat: Vicious by V.E. Schwab (Vicious #1)

Vicious by V.E. Schwab is a book I had always planned on reading but I kept pushing it back because I love Schwab’s writing and I didn’t want to not have a book of hers to look forward to reading.  Since the release of This Savage Song has been drawing nearer, I decided to pick it up on a whim and I couldn’t be more happy that my July reading started off with such a bang!  Vicious explores a complicated relationship between an anti-hero and villain and I love that it’s up to the reader to determine which of the main characters falls into which role.  The story begins ten years prior when Victor Vale and Eli Ever are working on their thesis involving EO’s or ExtraOrdinary humans.  They make several groundbreaking discoveries which leads to experiments and chaos.

Vicious

I love that Schwab chose to acknowledge and go with the Marvel route of naming superheroes, that is to say, each character is named alliteratively.  Victor Vale has spent the past ten years in prison planning exactly how he would try to kill Eli Ever when they were finally reunited again.  He meets a chocolate milk loving friend Mitch and an intriguing twelve year old girl named Sydney along the way and it is a pleasure to see the story unfold along with them.  I love how it’s constantly jumping perspectives and periods in time.  Between the flashbacks told as if they were currently occurring and the present situations everyone finds themselves in in real time, I felt even more connected to the story than I would have if the stories had simply been relayed from a character who experienced it to a current fixture in either of Victor or Eli’s lives.  Even more fascinating than the present, is watching each character’s descent into madness and attempting to determine who is the hero and who is the villain (or if there even is one or the other).   For those wondering, I’m team Victor.

Final Thoughts:  Vicious by V.E. Schwab is a quick paced adventure story which delves into the psyches of Victor Vale and Eli Ever.  It’ll have you questioning what it means to be a villain vs. a hero and the constant switching between past and present timelines will allow you to see the hero vs. villain origin stories developing as soon as those initial seeds are planted.  Vicious reads like a really engaging contemporary psychology novel with a sci-fi twist as the main characters begin experimenting with ExtraOrdinary humans.  Vicious is technically an adult novel but everything about it is very accessible for anyone who typically reads and enjoys YA.  I definitely recommend this one wholeheartedly!

Rating 6

Victor and Eli started out as college roommates—brilliant, arrogant, lonely boys who recognized the same sharpness and ambition in each other. In their senior year, a shared research interest in adrenaline, near-death experiences, and seemingly supernatural events reveals an intriguing possibility: that under the right conditions, someone could develop extraordinary abilities. But when their thesis moves from the academic to the experimental, things go horribly wrong. Ten years later, Victor breaks out of prison, determined to catch up to his old friend (now foe), aided by a young girl whose reserved nature obscures a stunning ability. Meanwhile, Eli is on a mission to eradicate every other super-powered person that he can find—aside from his sidekick, an enigmatic woman with an unbreakable will. Armed with terrible power on both sides, driven by the memory of betrayal and loss, the archnemeses have set a course for revenge—but who will be left alive at the end? (via Goodreads)

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Tea & Book Chat: The Unexpected Everything by Morgan Matson

I really super love Morgan Matson so I was eager to read her new book, The Unexpected Everything as soon as it debuted.  The Unexpected Everything is about Type A girl named Andie who is a serious planner (which really speaks to my heart).  Andie has gotten used to a certain way of life but as her summer is beginning, her father gets caught up in a big political scandal which results in him spending much more time at home than he ever had before and Andie’s impressive summer internship getting cancelled.  She’s forced to spend the summer at home but things seem to be going much better than she anticipated, especially when Clark comes into the picture. She has a very close group of girlfriends, gets a job as a dog walker and begins seeing the joy in the unexpected, despite it being a huge adjustment.

The Unexpected Everything

The Unexpected Everything is longer than Matson’s previous novels and while the beginning was a tiny bit slow for my liking, I still ended up loving it overall.  In The Unexpected Everything Matson covers romantic relationships, parental relationships and friendships so it’s no wonder the book is 519 pages.  I appreciated that she managed to cover and get the reader to care about all three.  It’s obvious that a huge amount of planning and development went into each unique relationship and it all works so harmoniously.  I love that she is able to cover everything since it’s rare that an individual would only be dealing with one at a time.  The romance in this book is my favorite of any of Matson’s previous books (although I haven’t read Second Chance Summer and I’m not sure if there’s romance in that one).  Clark is a fantasy writer and he’s such a swoony character.  I love how nervous and insecure he can be at points and I love how interested he is in other people.  He’s a keeper!  I also really liked Andie’s dad and I was rooting for him to be able to mend their relationship after a distance grew between them.  And as for Andie’s friends, they are such a fun and tight knit group.  There was one predictable thing that I saw coming but I thought it was handled really well.  The Unexpected Everything really encapsulates everything that I love about Matson’s books from the adventurous summer vibes to the delicious eateries (Captain Pizza and Paradise Ice Cream which you may recognize from Since You’ve Been Gone) and of course, the heartwarming characters that capture your heart.

Final Thoughts:  The Unexpected Everything by Morgan Matson is a wonderfully in depth summer contemporary about a girl learning to let go of her plans and go with the flow of life.  Andie, Clark, her friend group and her father will leave you wondering about their futures long after you finish reading.  They’re the kind of characters that stay with you.  Also there are cute puppies.  If you want a quick paced beach read that’s a bit on the heavier side and you enjoy witty banter and texting with emojis, you should check out The Unexpected Everything.

Rating 5

Andie had it all planned out. 

When you are a politician’s daughter who’s pretty much raised yourself, you learn everything can be planned or spun, or both. Especially your future.

Important internship? Check.

Amazing friends? Check.

Guys? Check (as long as we’re talking no more than three weeks).

But that was before the scandal. Before having to be in the same house with her dad. Before walking an insane number of dogs. That was before Clark and those few months that might change her whole life.

Because here’s the thing—if everything’s planned out, you can never find the unexpected. 

And where’s the fun in that? (via Goodreads)

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Tea & Book Chat: Highly Illogical Behavior by John Corey Whaley

Highly Illogical Behavior by John Corey Whaley is the kind of book that makes me want to get on a rooftop and scream about how much I love it (but since that sounds dangerous, I’ll just gush about it here in my review).  Highly Illogical Behavior is told in dual perspectives and it follows a 16 year old boy named Solomon who suffers from panic induced agoraphobia and 17 year old Lisa who is determined to cure him and write a brilliant essay about her experience so she can get into college and move far away from Upland, California.  Lisa remembers Solomon from middle school when he had the final incident that led to him living inside his parents house without being able to go outside (not even his backyard, driveway or open garage) for the past three years.  She reaches out to him “by chance” and soon become a fixture in his life.

Highly Illogical Behavior

I instantly fell in love with Solomon.  He’s a Star Trek obsessed sarcastic teenager who enjoys playing Munchkin, so yeah, his character immediately filled up some of my heart space.  I love that while Solomon struggles with mental illness, a reader would never be able to use that as his main identifying characteristic.  He is so much more than a kid who’s afraid to go outside.  He’s a friendly and thoughtful person and his sense of humor, including the ability to make fun of himself, just adds to his charm.  I actually found Lisa to be less sane than Solomon but I still had a soft spot for her.  I don’t think her decision making is at its peak in this novel but her passion and determination are qualities I always admire in people.  Then there’s Clark, who’s the quintessential good / nice guy.  He seems a little lost about his own future and apathetic toward his fellow Water Polo teammates since all they care about is hooking up with girls while he’s respectful of his relationship with Lisa.  Lisa inevitably introduces Clark to Solomon and we all know the saying “three’s a crowd.”  Their relationship becomes complex in the most interesting ways but the tone of the novel remains the same.  Dinners with Solomon’s equally funny parents and his firecracker of a grandmother help lighten the mood when things get heavy but they never take away from the issues present.

Final Thoughts:  Highly Illogical Behavior by John Corey Whaley is a must read for everyone.  It’s impossible to judge how mental illness is portrayed because it effects everyone afflicted with it differently so while I cannot say whether it is accurate or not, I can say that to someone like me who has low level anxiety, it felt real.  I’m just so utterly charmed by these characters and I’m amazed at how Whaley is able to tell such a full and satisfying story in such a short number of pages.  Normally I am bothered by open endings but in this case I think it’s the right choice.  Solomon, Lisa and Clark have so much life ahead of them to evolve and change and grow into who they’ll ultimately be.  This book gets all the thumbs up and I sincerely hope you’ll consider checking it out.

Chibi-Rating-6

Sixteen-year-old Solomon is agoraphobic. He hasn’t left the house in three years, which is fine by him.

Ambitious Lisa desperately wants to get into the second-best psychology program for college (she’s being realistic). But is ambition alone enough to get her in?

Enter Lisa.

Determined to “fix” Sol, Lisa steps into his world, along with her charming boyfriend, Clark, and soon the three form an unexpected bond. But, as Lisa learns more about Sol and he and Clark grow closer and closer, the walls they’ve built around themselves start to collapse and their friendships threaten to do the same. (via Goodreads)

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Tea & Book Chat: The Geek’s Guide to Unrequited Love by Sarvenaz Tash

The Geek’s Guide to Unrequited Love is a must read for any fan who’s ever attended a convention.  This story really hit home for me because it takes place at my home con, New York Comic Con, over the period of Friday – Sunday.  I thought because the story takes place at a convention I have been attending for years that I wouldn’t be able to put nitpicky things aside and enjoy the plot but Tash’s convention depiction is pure perfection.  She got all of the little details right between methodically planning cosplay and your daily schedule, to avoiding people in larger than life costumes and even to the seating arrangements on the Long Island Rail Road.  I even love how the cover photo is taken outside the Javits Center on 11th Ave because it makes it that much more authentic.  One thing to note is that the diner Tash talks about outside the convention center on 11th Ave was recently closed and is being turned into a high rise building (but that happened after she would’ve already gone through the publishing process) and having eaten there myself I was so happy to see it included.  (Side story: Funnily enough, the last time Andrew (who works for a structural engineering firm) and I walked past it, he said mark my words, that one story diner will never last to the end of this year.  There’s so much wasted sky space and lo and behold, he was absolutely correct.) Also, I could not possibly have empathized more re: line drama UGH.

the geek's guide to unrequited love

Even more important than the setting, Tash also captures the spirit of fandom and young love as told by our narrator Graham.  Graham is the most endearing type of nerd and he’s been harboring a crush on his best friend in the whole world, Roxana.  He decides that NYCC is the perfect place to tell her and he spends a huge chunk of his time daydreaming and planning about how he’ll make a grand enough gesture without potentially frightening her.  I also have to note that Tash mentions the epic upside-down-in-the-rain Spider-Man kiss on page one so you can bet that I was hooked.  Despite the geeky references and the goings on of NYCC, The Geek’s Guide to Unrequited Love tells a much bigger coming of age story that is not even the slightest bit overshadowed by the amount of pop culture it contains.  I genuinely wish that John Hughes were still around so he could adapt this novel because I think many pop culture nerds would love to see this on screen.  The supporting characters, Casey and Felicia were among my favorites in the story and if I have one complaint, it’s that I would’ve liked to have gotten to know Roxana a bit better because what I did learn about her, I really admired. (Although, I would also love to read a book from college Graham’s perspective.  He really weaved his way into my heart!)

Final Thoughts:  If The Geek’s Guide to Unrequited Love by Sarvenez Tash is not yet on your radar and you’ve ever been to and enjoyed a comic convention, you need to pick up this book immediately.  It’s such a fun look at how pop culture brings people together and the entire time I was reading, I felt like I time traveled back to high school to hang out with my group of friends.  The book is entirely accurate and you’ll feel the nerd rage that I’m sure you’ve experienced IRL when you join Graham, Roxana, Casey and Felicia throughout certain moments in their adventure.  The story is engaging, the characters will warm your heart and the setting is everything – especially when we’re smack dab in the middle of con season!

Rating 6

John Hughes meets Comic Con in this hilarious, unabashedly romantic, coming-of-age novel about a teenager who is trying to get his best friend to fall in love with him from the author ofThree Day Summer.

Peter Parker and Gwen Stacy…
Archie and Veronica…
Althena and Noth…
…Graham and Roxy?

Graham met his best friend, Roxana, when he moved into her neighborhood eight years ago, and she asked him which Hogwarts house he’d be sorted into. Graham has been in love with her ever since.

But now they’re sixteen, still neighbors, still best friends. And Graham and Roxy share more than ever—moving on from their Harry Potter obsession to a serious love of comic books.

When Graham learns that the creator of their favorite comic, The Chronicles of Althena, is making a rare appearance at this year’s New York Comic Con, he knows he must score tickets. And the event inspires Graham to come up with the perfect plan to tell Roxy how he really feels about her. He’s got three days to woo his best friend at the coolest, kookiest con full of superheroes and supervillains. But no one at a comic book convention is who they appear to be…even Roxy. And Graham is starting to realize fictional love stories are way less complicated than real-life ones. (via goodreads)

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Tea & Book Chat: Summer in the Invisible City by Juliana Romano

*This book was sent to me by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.  This is no way swayed my opinions.*

Summer in the Invisible City by Juliana Romano is a coming of age YA novel that takes place in New York City.  I always love reading about my city through the eyes of other people so I’ve been eager to check this one out since I first heard about it.  I also feel like the cover is an excellent representation of people who live in NYC (their clothes choices are spot on) and I love the outline of the skyline behind them.  The novel follows Sadie, a teen taking a summer photography class, during the summer between her sophomore and junior years of high school.  Sadie is at that pivotal point in her life when she over analyzes every situation and the circumstances that she’s faced with does not make it any easier for her to handle.

Summer in the Invisible City

Sadie is a really interesting character to read from the perspective of.  She’s not your typical strong female character but her summer experiences transform her.  Sadie is vulnerable and desperate at times, especially when it comes to handling her less than perfect father.  Allan is an “important” artist who Sadie has been looking up to her entire life.  He’s the reason she became interested in photography and the reason she wants to attend art school for her college education.  She’s spent years of her life trying to impress him but no matter what she does, he remains uninterested.  It’s heartbreaking to read about their relationship because he is just such a disappointing person and it’s for reasons completely independent of Sadie.  As if her father visiting NYC for the month weren’t enough, Sadie is also struggling with her social life.  One of the “popular” girls is in her summer class and they begin to form a friendship but it seems to be coming at a cost to her relationship with her long time best friend Willa.  Willa is probably my favorite character in the book. She’s so certain of herself at such a young age and you can tell how much she cares about Sadie.  I only wish we had gotten more of an ending for her character.  The there’s Sam and Noah but I won’t go into them because it’ll be more interesting to discover as you read (but I promise it’s not a love triangle!).  It’s a combination of the relationships between people and the time period in Sadie’s life that this book takes place that make it special.

Final Thoughts:  Summer in the Invisible City by Juliana Romano is an enjoyable coming of age story taking place is the greatest city in the world, New York (not that I’m biased or anything).  It blurs the lines between fluffy beach read and raw contemporary, exploring the positive and negative relationships in Sadie’s life and how they’re altered throughout her summer as she figures out who she is.  I would recommend this book to anyone who’s ever felt a little bit lost in their life and is looking for a character that displays a different type of strength in her own time.

Rating 5

A sparkling coming-of-age story about self-discovery, first love, and the true meaning of family, perfect for fans of Jenny Han and Sarah Dessen.

Seventeen-year-old Sadie Bell has this summer all figured out: She’s going to befriend the cool girls at her school. She’s going to bond with her absentee father, a famous artist, and impress him with her photography skills. And she’s finally going to get over Noah, the swoony older guy who was her very first mistake.

Sadie wasn’t counting on meeting Sam, a funny and free-thinking boy who makes her question all of her goals. But even after a summer of talking, touching, and sharing secrets, Sam says he just wants to be friends. And when those Sadie cares about most hurt her, Sam’s friendship may not be enough. Sadie can see the world through her camera, but can she see the people who have loved and supported her all along?

Set against a glamorous New York City backdrop, this coming-of-age romance is a gorgeous summer read—one whose characters will stay with you long into the fall. (via Goodreads)

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Tea & Movie Chat: Finding Dory

Andrew and I had the pleasure of seeing an early screening of Pixar’s newest film, Finding Dory, last night and I have to say that I loved every minute of it.  Often sequels are nowhere near as good as their predecessors and one of the most challenging obstacles is to turn a side character into a main character, and harder yet is to do it well.  Finding Dory excels on all of these points.  As we all know from Finding Nemo, Dory is an optimistic fish that suffers from short term memory loss.  She’s endearing and her constant confusion leads to plenty of laughs for the audience but in Finding Dory, her songs and rhymes adapt a deeper meaning.  Dory begins having memories of her parents and story takes off from there.  She, Marlin and Nemo set off on another cross ocean adventure as Dory tries to piece together the few memories that begin to resurface.

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My favorite character is hands down Hank the octopus who is voiced by Ed O’Neill.  Hank is desperate to avoid being released into the ocean and he begrudgingly assists Dory in her search.  He perpetuates a tough guy exterior but it’s clear he has a lot more heart than he lets on.  And his constant camouflaging to evade humans is extremely comical.  I also loved Destiny, the mostly blind whale voiced by Kaitlin Olson who is super friendly and positive despite always bumping into walls.  Oh and I have to say that Dory is the cutest fish baby.  Her flashbacks of her parents teaching her about her memory loss are heartwarming to the max.  I wanted to reach into the screen to hug her and tell her that everything would be okay.

Overall, the message that Finding Dory tackles is so important.  Just because Dory is different, it doesn’t mean that she’s incapable of solving problems in her own way.  Sometimes, thinking outside the box is necessary!  Dory proves that different is good and she will no doubt be a role model for anyone living with any type of ailment that’s made them feel inadequate at some point.  There were quite a few moments where I found myself tearing up whether it be out of sadness or joy for the lovable marine life.  To get personal for a moment,I always found Dory to be hilarious in Finding Nemo but in the past year my grandmother has been suffering with Alzheimer’s so Dory’s memory loss as portrayed in this new installment really hit home for me.  I can’t even imagine how frustrating it must be to know something or someone important but be unable to recall what / who it is.  I felt a deep emotional connection to Dory and I was rooting for her all the way.

Rating 5

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